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Recent Blog Posts

Illustration by Maren Wickwire/Manifest Media

The Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) is one of the most infamous, long-standing armed groups in the world. Its repertoire of violence includes mass abductions, particularly of more...

Yemen was already deep in the throes of a humanitarian crisis before the cyclone hit

Last month, the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) reviewed two resolutions to investigate serious violations of international law committed during the conflicts in Sri Lanka and Yemen. In the case of the Sri Lankan civil war, which ended in 2009, the Council approved a more...

Taken in N. Iraq in 1991 during Operation Provide Comfort. Lt. Col. John Abizaid speaking with some Kurds. / Wikimedia Commons

In a protracted armed conflict, particularly a civil war, common sense would dictate that a “safe zone” – a protected area free of weapons and conflict, for the exclusive use of humanitarian actors and civilians – would do nothing but good. Indeed, since the more...

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